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Garmins Latest New Toy - Power Meter


By Brian - Posted on 19 August 2011

NB: Originally posted elsewhere on the Global Riders Network and appears via syndication.

The latest toy from Garmin and a new way to measure your power.

http://garmin.blogs.com/my_weblog/2011/08/garmin...

... when it becomes cheaper is all. Maybe next year Eye-wink

Don't forget this replaces your set of pedals and cadence sensor so it's not that outrageous Eye-wink

And I was hoping this product would bring down the price of power meters.

It will be interesting to see what software will surface for these since they are measuring the strain on each pedal. Technically you should be able to see your complete pedal stroke for each leg which could help with your technique.

Of greater concern to us (as MTB or Criterium racers) is the huge increased chance of pedal strike in corners.

It will be an expensive impact if you hit that dangly bit on a rock or grounded it mid-pedal stroke at 40kph in a crit.

Frankly, its a retarded design by people who dont ride bikes. I dont really claim to understand the physics, but surely inertia/vector/axle flex could be measured above the crank arm rather than hanging below it?

I'll stick with my SRM...

Given the price, exclusive pedal platform (i.e. of no use to riders on Speedplay, Shimano, Time etc?) and the points raised by Antsonline above it appears they'll have limited appeal but may suit cashed up sportive riding Look users?
Wonder how easy they are to calibrate given you'll have two modules to set-up/balance?

Antsonline,
My buddy Clark Foy who was co-founder of MetriGear, the start-up that designed this product, would be amused to hear you call him someone who doesn't race bikes. He actually races rather well with San Jose Bike Club as a Cat 2. Clark is a super smart engineer and we've seen prototypes these pedals being raced hard since 2009. They really do work well on road bikes and give you much better training feedback than a powermeter.

ok - saying that he didnt ride bikes was a bit strong. I cant understand why they would design something that would reduce the ground clearance on a pedal at the ground stroke though.
If he is a mate, please ask him why it couldnt be put 'above' the pedal insted of below - as I am not clever enough to understand the physics.
I have had pedal strikes many times racing at all levels in criteriums, in fact, I moved to Speedplay pedals to reduce the risk of this!

I do beleive they work. No arguments there. Many things would work, but the practicality of them currently seems limited. It may be that the drop is not as big as the pictures suggest.

Ants, at 0.32s in the second video they show a graphic where the sensor head is positioned above the rear pedal and below the front. so it looks likely that the ANT+ transmitter package is fixed in orientation to the crank arm not the pedal body.

Not as protected as a transmitter inside the arm or hub, but better than one spinning around in the air, and with much less crank arm extension.

It also looks like the unit could be oriented so it was swung hard against the crank arm with almost zero effective crank arm extension.

Ants, at 0.32s in the second video they show a graphic where the sensor head is positioned above the rear pedal and below the front. so it looks likely that the ANT+ transmitter package is fixed in orientation to the crank arm not the pedal body.

I suspect that's because it's 180deg opposed to the front pedal. Won't the forward facing arm always have the sensor at the bottom and therefore the rear always at the top?

That's kinda what I was trying to say... from the previous comments it appeared that the transmitter hung below the pedal body and was always closest to the road.

$1500?
Ill stick to my HRM.
Theyre great, 100g, $40, can switch between roadie and mtb, and 0% increase chance of pedal strike!

ok ok - maybe i havent read the book, training and racing with a powermeter.

Yep, I want too. When it's cheaper.

Would be helpful I reckon in identifying and sorting out any dodginess in pedalling technique. Strongly suspect that's a factor in my ongoing lower back issues.

Is where it is at.

$1500 is pretty competitive really, Powertap costs about $1000 for the basic model, Quarq Cinqo is $1800 and SRM your looking at $2500.

I think that is pretty good really, in an ideal world I would of purchased a Quarq, however due to cost, went for a powertap. It should arrive this week, can't wait.

Have you ordered the new version PT hubs?
http://www.bikeradar.com/news/article/cycleops-n...
Interested to see how those are compared with user feedback I've had on the originals.

When my legs fry and my lungs start to come out of my ears, I am at maximum power

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